Coney Island

2064.

A Trip to Coney Island. Felter Hotel.

2065.

A Trip to Coney Island. The Ocean House.

2067.

A Trip to Coney Island. 2067. The Toll Gate Beneath the Willows, on the Shell Road.

2067.

A Trip to Coney Island. The Toll Gate beneath the Willows, on the Shell Road.

2068.

A Trip to Coney Island. The Creek at Low Tide.

2070.

A Trip to Coney Island. View on the Creek, near the Toll Gate.

2070.

View on the Creek, near the Toll Gate.

2072.

A Trip to Coney Island. No. 2072. All Aboard-Ready to Start.

2073.

A Trip to Coney Island. View on the Beach.

2074.

A Trip to Coney Island. View on the Beach.

2075.

A Trip to Coney Island. View on the Beach.

2076.

A Trip to Coney Island. Wyckoff, Governor of Coney Island.

5365.

A Trip to Coney Island. A View on the Beach.

5366.

A Trip to Coney Island. A View on the Beach.

10769.

Coney Island.

10770.

Coney Island.

10773.

Coney Island.

11300.

Manhattan Beach Hotel.

11301.

Manhattan Beach Hotel.

11302.

Manhattan Beach Hotel.

11303.

Music Stand. Manhattan Beach.

11304.

Coney Island, Brighton Beach Hotel.

11305.

Brighton Beach Hotel.

11306.

Brighton Beach Hotel.

11307.

Music Stand. Brighton Beach.

11308.

Beach View.

11309.

Beach View.

11310.

Beach View.

11311.

Beach View.

11313.

Beach View.

11314.

Beach View.

11315.

Beach View.

11316.

Beach View.

11317.

Beach View.

11318.

Beach View.

11319.

Feltman’s Hotel.

11320.

Cables Hotel.

11321.

Elevator.

11323.

The Iron Pier.

11324.

The Iron Pier.

11325.

The Iron Pier. Interior.

11326.

Coney Island. I am uncertain of the number on this view just assuming as the next numbered view is similar.

11327.

Marine Railway.

11328.

Marine R.R. Station at Manhattan. (refers to Manhattan Beach).

11329.

Station at Brighton Beach.

11526.

Coney Island, Feltman’s Pavilion.

12472.

Moving Brighton Beach Hotel, Coney Island, with Locomotives, by B.C. Miller & Sons, House Movers, 979 and 998 Bergen Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. There are illustrations and an article on the moving of this hotel in Scientific American, April 14, 1888, cover and p.230.

12939.

Connelly Motor Streetcar/Trolley in New York. This is one of the earliest uses of a gasoline powered motor in a trolley.  It shows a conductor at the controls. The side of the streetcar shows patent dates from 1886. This is railway car number 1.  Streetcars made by Connelly Motor Company operated on the Brooklyn Flatbush & Coney Island Railway. Also was used on the Elizabeth & Newark Horse Railroad. These cars didn’t last too long due to the smell of the exhaust and the noise. In 1878 the first American patent on a gasoline motor was filed by The Connelly Motor Company of New York. It advertised automobiles for sale in 1888, thus constituting one of the earliest known (and perhaps the first) gasoline driven motor cars available to the public. The Daimler and the Duryea were offered for sale in 1891 and 1892, respectively.

13001.

West Brighton Beach. The “Merry-go-around.” This is Chas. I.D. Looff’s 1st merry-go0round. He stands at the center.

Charles Looff was born as Carl Jürgen Detlev Looff on May 24, 1852 in Bad Bramstedt, Duchy of Holstein, German Confederation (temporary occupied by Denmark in second Schleswig War). His father Jürgen Detlef Christian Looff was a master blacksmith and wagon builder. Watching his father, Carl learned how to work with metal and wood. To avoid the coming war, Carl emigrated to the United States. Arriving in Castle Garden, New York City, on August 14, 1870, he changed his first name to Charles. In low German, the letters I and J look very much alike, and confusion set in as to his initials. Somehow, his name became Charles I. D. Looff instead of J. D. Looff.

Settling on Leonard Street in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, he found work as a carver at a furniture factory. Working part-time as a ballroom dance instructor, Looff met and married Anna Dolle, also from Germany, in 1874. After working in the furniture factory all day, he took scraps of wood home to his apartment and began carving them into carousel animals. Young Looff assembled his wooden horses and animals onto a circular platform and created his first merry-go-round. In 1876, he installed his ride at Lucy Vandeveer’s Bathing Pavilion at West Sixth Street and Surf Avenue. This was Coney Island’s first carousel and first amusement ride.

Looff opened a factory at 30 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn and continued building more carousels.

13002.

Observatory, Coney Island.

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